Posts Tagged ‘Workplace Policy’

Employers: update your Workplace Harassment policy. Amendments to the Occupational Health and Safety Act come into force September 2016.

April 7th, 2016 by Shelina Ali

Bill 132, Sexual Violence and Harassment Action Plan Act received royal assent on March 8, 2016 and will come into force in September 2016.   It makes several important amendments to the provisions dealing with workplace harassment in the Occupational Health and Safety Act (the Act).

Workplace sexual harassment is now explicitly included in the definition of workplace harassment and is a defined term under the Act.   The amendments also clarify that a reasonable action taken by an employer or supervisor in managing employees does not constitute harassment.  A reasonable action is not defined under the Act, and will need to be determined on a case by case basis. Read the rest of this entry

R v. Cole and an employee’s reasonable expectation of privacy

November 29th, 2012 by Shelina Ali

Technology has become central to the workplace, with employers regularly providing employees with access to computers and other devices for use in the course of work and employment activities. Personal use of these devices often becomes incidental, especially as the boundaries between the workplace and home blur. As a result, questions arise over who really owns the personal information generated on these workplace devices and the extent of an employee’s privacy rights over any personal information stored on these devices.

The recent Supreme Court of Canada decision of R. v. Cole indicates that an employee’s personal information, even if stored on computers owned by an employer, may attract a reasonable expectation of privacy.

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Employees beware: The perils of posting on Facebook

October 25th, 2012 by Priya Sarin

The dramatic growth of social media use in Canada on such sites as Facebook has raised novel legal issues for employers and employees. One such issue is whether or not an employee’s off-duty conduct online (i.e. posting personal status updates, photos or comments on Facebook at home) can get that employee fired. In short, the answer is yes.

Many Canadians still erroneously believe that what they post on their personal Facebook page is private. They feel little hesitation in coming home after a difficult day at work and griping publicly about their company, boss, co‑workers or quality of work. While it is important to protect freedom of expression and healthy discourse on labour relations issues, posting this type of content online may have serious consequences.

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