What can you expect from articling with Iler Campbell?

May 8th, 2017 by Iler Campbell

In short: to do meaningful work for organizations making a difference in their community, while being mentored by a passionate team of practitioners.

As the only student in a small general service firm, you’ll get a taste of all our practice areas, including charity & non‑profit law, commercial law, real estate, human rights, landlord and tenant law, employment law, construction, corporate governance & structuring, estate law and civil litigation.

You’ll be exposed to all the firm’s major client groups, including housing co‑operatives, affordable housing developers, non‑profit organizations in a variety of industries, progressive for‑profit organizations.

What makes Iler Campbell different?

At Iler Campbell, we believe in the social goals of our clients, so we see our role as helping our clients do what they do – be it run a better housing co‑operative, build more renewable energy projects, create more affordable housing, or provide a charitable benefit.

We are actively involved in community‑level organizations by sitting on boards, committees or volunteering with non‑profit and charitable organizations.

What kind of work does the articling student do?

You will be asked to research and prepare client opinions that provide practical legal advice on a wide range of legal issues. Students are also trained to represent housing providers at the Landlord & Tenant Board at mediation sessions and merits hearings. Most of the firm’s civil litigation work comes from our corporate and real estate development clients; as a result, articling candidates should come expecting mostly solicitor and administrative law work – there is no guarantee that each articling period will involve much litigation. If any comes through the door, the articling student will be involved. This could include drafting submissions, preparing for examinations and disclosure, and observing court appearances. You may also get the chance to appear on simple motions or small claims court matters.

Most students are exposed to at least some stages of an affordable housing project ‑ from the purchase or sale of land, obtaining construction financing, the creation of a condominium corporation, to the sale of affordable housing units. For the student, work on these files can involve drafting agreements, organizing due diligence materials or reviewing closing documents.

Our articling student is also involved in the corporate law services we provide to our clients. This can involve reviewing by‑laws for legislative compliance, drafting employment or human rights policies and research on corporate structuring. These files involve consulting relevant legislation and preparing plain‑language materials that help our clients make decisions and understand their responsibilities as directors of a corporation, employers, housing providers, or in fulfilling their duties under the Human Rights Code or other relevant legislation.

We are a small firm, so there is no formal rotation. You will receive work directly from the lawyer working on the file and likely have a mix of litigation and corporate/transactional work on the go at the same time.

For example, in one day, you could be attending a hearing at the Landlord and Tenant Board in the morning, researching an employment law issue in the afternoon, and attending a housing co‑operative board meeting to review their by‑laws in the evening.

In sum, you can expect to be exposed to a very broad range of practice areas and have a real impact on the work we do for our co‑operative, non‑profit and progressive business clients.

Come article with us!

Please submit your application for the 2018-19 articling year by Friday, July 7 to info@ilercampbell.com. Please include a cover letter, resume, reference letters and copies of your transcripts. We look forward to hearing from you!

Proposed class action challenges wait times for support services for adults with developmental disabilities

April 27th, 2017 by Michael Hackl

This article was first published on rabble.ca

Many Ontarians with developmental disabilities face a significant problem when they reach their 18th birthday. Specifically, while they have received services and support from the government during their childhood, upon turning 18 they are treated as adults under the law in Ontario and those services and support are typically discontinued immediately, even though their disabilities still exist, and even though that support is often necessary to meet their most basic human needs.

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Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation: July 1, 2017 on the horizon — are you ready?

April 10th, 2017 by Ted Hyland

Updated May 11, 2017: Corrections/clarifications to the 4th and 7th bullet points below.

If you were keeping close tabs three years ago on the advent of Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL), you may be forgiven if you lost sight of it in the past three years. After all, you worked hard to ensure that your organization would be able to send commercial electronic messages (CEMs) once July 1, 2014 rolled around.

Well, it’s time to pay attention again, because July 1, 2017 marks the coming into force of a couple of important features to CASL. Read the rest of this post

The law is settled on sexual assault. When will the legal system catch up?

March 30th, 2017 by Shelina Ali

This article was first published on rabble.ca

Over the past year, the treatment of sexual assault complainants in the justice system has received a great deal of mainstream media attention. Much of the coverage has focused on how unfairly sexual assault complainants are treated. Examples include:

  • The cross-examination of complainants in the Jian Gomeshi case and the judge’s findings that inconsistencies in the complainants’ testimony made them not credible.
  • Comments made by Justice Robin Camp during a sexual assault trial in Alberta — asking why the victim didn’t keep her knees together — that ultimately led to his resignation.
  • A comment by a Nova Scotia judge that a drunk person can consent — in a trial where the complainant was found by police unconscious and undressed in the back of a cab.

And then, just this past week, the Supreme Court of Canada released a one-sentence decision that sums up the exasperation at the failings of the justice system when it comes to sexual assault.

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Iler Campbell featured in CBC news article on housing co-ownership

March 22nd, 2017 by Iler Campbell

Lauren Blumas is featured in a CBC news article highlighting “creative solutions to unattainable house prices.” The article highlights: the trend of co-buying homes; a couple who’ve elected to stay renters in the city while buying income property outside of the city; and non-profit condo developer (and Iler Campbell client) Options for Homes.

Lauren is quoted on the need for “co-purchasers sign a legally binding document called a co-ownership or co-tenancy agreement prior to buying the home.”

Read the article here.

Federal Non Profit Corporations: Deadline of July 31, 2017 to transition from Canada Corporations Act to Canada Not-for-Profit Corporations Act

March 21st, 2017 by Ted Hyland

If you’re involved in a non‑profit organization that was incorporated under the Canada Corporations Act and your organization has not completed the transition to the Canada Not‑for‑profit Corporations Act, then you have until July 31, 2017 to do so. Corporations Canada has issued a notice that if the transition is not completed by July 31st, the corporation will be dissolved. In other words, the corporation will cease to exist, legally, and if it’s a registered charity, it could lose its charitable registration.

To obtain more details about what’s involved in completing the transition, you can check out the “Transition Guide” on Corporations Canada’s website.

If you have any questions about the transition process, you can also contact one of our lawyers.