Charities

And the 2016 AMS/John Hodgson Award of Excellence in Charity and Not‑For‑Profit Law goes to…. Brian Iler!

May 8th, 2016 by Iler Campbell

In 42 years of practising law, Brian Iler has focused on enabling social change.  Through his passionate efforts he has had a significant and sustaining impact on the non‑profit sector.  The Ontario Bar Association has recognized Brian’s work by awarding him the 2016 AMS/John Hodgson Award of Excellence in Charity and Not‑For‑Profit Law. And we couldn’t be prouder.

Brian, ever‑modest about his achievements, says: “I’m delighted. First, because the wonderful people in my firm chose to nominate me, and also that my peers in the profession have chosen to recognize the work I’ve done. Not that it’s over yet!”

What follows is our nomination letter:

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Charity law blocks progress on issues facing Canadians

February 17th, 2015 by Iler Campbell

Saturday’s edition of the Toronto Star features an op-ed penned by Brian and Garfield Mahood. In it they write of Canadian charities under attack for turning a spotlight onto the Harper government’s policies or for advocating for public policy change. CRA audits of charitable status, they write, are creating a culture of self-censorship that is inhibiting many NGOs from working effectively.

Read the full article here

The Canada Not for Profit Corporations Act – have you transitioned yet?

October 22nd, 2014 by Celia Chandler

A representative of Industry Canada spoke at a charity law conference last week and reminded us that last Friday  ‑ October 17, 2014 ‑ was the deadline to “continue” federal non‑profits under the new Canada Not‑for‑Profit Corporations Act.  However, she also assured conference‑goers that dissolution is not automatic.  Industry Canada will first clear the backlog of last minute continuance applications that it has received.  Then it will begin the process of contacting those corporations which missed the deadline.  She acknowledged that many of those who have not yet filed have very likely done so deliberately – as a way to dissolve dormant corporations without taking any active steps.  Others will have missed the deadline by mistake and those will get 120 days’ written notice of dissolution.   If you’re not sure if your organization has taken the steps it should have taken, you can check its status on Industry Canada’s website.

And as always, if you need help with the transition, give us a call!

Charities and the limits of political action under the Harper government

July 31st, 2014 by Brian Iler

Environmental Defence. PEN Canada. Amnesty International Canada. The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. Canada Without Poverty. The David Suzuki Foundation.

What do these organizations have in common — aside from all doing great work?

All are registered charities.

All have been publicly critical of Stephen Harper’s government.

And all are undergoing audits of their political activities by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA).

What’s this about? Here’s what you need to know.

Read more on rabble.ca

Canada Revenue Agency’s Guidance: How to Draft Purposes for Charitable Registration (CG 019)

August 12th, 2013 by Ted Hyland

On July 25, 2013, the Charities Directorate of the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) issued policy guidance on how to draft purposes clauses for charitable registration. At the same time, CRA also issued revised Model Purposes clauses.

The Guidance will apply to new applicants for charitable registration, existing registered charities that are seeking to change their charitable purposes and, undoubtedly, will be used by CRA in auditing registered charities and assessing their eligibility for ongoing registration.

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Client Profile: Architectural Conservancy of Ontario

July 17th, 2013 by Iler Campbell

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The Architectural Conservancy of Ontario is a charity with the goal of helping communities preserve buildings and structures of architectural merit and places of natural beauty and interest. Their activities include advocacy and activism, the commissioning of studies and reports as well as public outreach and education programs. Twice yearly they publish ACORN, a magazine devoted to preservation issues of province-wide interest . Their PreservationWorks! program sends experts to assess and report on heritage properties and can assist in gaining public support, warn of structural issues and suggest preservation strategies. And their Historic Architectural Linking Program connects prospective purchasers with vacant, at-risk heritage properties. The Conservancy has 24 branches across Ontario. Branch activities include lectures, tours and advocacy and restoration of heritage properties.

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